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Welcome to the NRC’s web information provided by Pistol Australia Inc.

 

ABOUT AIR PISTOL CYLINDERS AND ISSF RULE 6.2.4 2 AT PA COMPETITION

Updated 04/11/2014

On this page

What the ISSF rules say>

It is the athlete’s responsibility>

Outside the validity date, and/or damaged>

What it means>

Role of Equipment Control>

Fill with the correct gas/pressure>

 

1.       What the ISSF rules say (2013/2nd printing):

6.2.4.2   It is the athlete’s responsibility that any air or CO2 cylinder is still within its validity date.  This may be checked by Equipment Control. 

And

6.7.7.1.g (Equipment Control Procedures)

It is the athlete’s responsibility that any air or CO2 cylinder is within manufacturer’s validity date (maximum of ten (10) years); this may be checked by Equipment Control and advisory recommendations may be given;

 

2.       What it means:

·         It is the athlete’s responsibility!  If the cylinder is outside the validity date, and/or damaged, and/or is being used improperly, it is the athlete’s (i.e. the shooter’s) responsibility.  There is NO responsibility real, implied or otherwise on the ISSF, AISL, PA, the competition organisers or competition officials; it is the shooter’s responsibility - end of story!

 

3.       Role of Equipment Control:

·         This may be checked by Equipment Control; Note that the wording is ‘may’, not ‘must’ or ‘will be’ – there is no requirement for the Equipment Control personnel to check the validity date.

·         Advisory recommendations may be given; Again, note that the wording is ‘may’, not ‘must’ or ‘will be’ – there is no requirement for the Equipment Control personnel to issue an advisory recommendation.

 

4.       Outside the validity date, and/or damaged, and/or is being used improperly:

·         What if your air pistol cylinder/s does not have a validity date?  Chances are that the cylinder is more than 10 years old.  German and Austrian manufacturers have been date stamping air pistol and air rifle cylinders for some time, other European manufacturers have only been doing so for the last few years.

·         Damaged.  If the cylinder is obviously damaged, don’t use it – drain all the air or CO2 and dispose of it responsibly.  Examples of damage include rust or other corrosion, physical damage (dents, scratches, etc.), damage to the bush holding the manometer from dropping the cylinder, etc.

·         Used improperly.  Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.” – Albert Einstein

E.g.:

o   Filling a 220bar cylinder from a 300bar supply: 220bar is about 3200psi or about 100 times the pressure in your car tyres – 300bar is nearly 4500psi!  It is not merely a matter of the cylinder’s integrity, the fittings can ‘blow’ (this is dramatic when it happens!). 

a)      They are meant to be foolproof in that the fittings are of different length so that a shooter cannot fill a 220bar cylinder from a 300bar supply, but people make up ‘adaptors’.

b)      300bar is not needed even for a 300bar cylinder – you can expect to get sighters and a full match from a  fill to 220bar.

 

5.       Re-testing cylinders:

The obvious solution for those of us that have cylinders more than 10 years old is to have the cylinder/s tested and certified…

·         Reading user manuals for pistols that have alloy cylinders, alloy cylinders used for air guns appear to have a 10-year life and are not to be inspected and recertified!

·         Steel cylinders in good condition can, in theory, be tested and re-certified.  The problem is that the cylinders used for air guns fall outside the range covered by Standards Australian (AS 2030.1): our CO2 cylinders do not hold enough CO2 to be covered by AS2030, and our compressed air cylinders fall under the pressure x capacity of the standard.

I.e. there is no Australian Standard for a licenced inspector to work to.

 

Fill with the correct gas/pressure, etc.:

While not related to 6.2.4.2, NOTE:

·         Filling a cylinder designed for CO2 from a 220bar or 300bar supply is the act of someone eager to get a mention in the Darwin Awards>: CO2 cylinders are designed for a much lower pressure!  See Einstein’s quote above…

·         Filling a CA cylinder designed for a 220bar from a 300bar supply is the act of someone eager to get a mention in the Darwin Awards>: 220 bar cylinders are designed for a lower pressure!  See Einstein’s quote above…

·         Greasing the threads and/or seals of a CA pistol with other than a non-flammable/non-combustible lubricant is the act of someone eager to get a mention in the Darwin Awards>: the pressures in CA means that the oxygen content is still about 20%, BUT there is a lot more of it!  See Einstein’s quote above…

 

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